It was 70 years ago today (06/08/15) that the atomic bomb was detonated over the city of Hiroshima in Japan. It was the first ever use of an atomic bomb as a weapon.

An American bomber called the Enola Gay dropped the atomic bomb called “Little Boy” on Hiroshima at 8.15 a.m. Japanese time, incinerating everything around it and instantly killing thousands of people, while others died later due to the effects of the radiation.

In Hiroshima you can visit the Peace Memorial Park where there is a cenotaph that holds all the names of those killed by the bomb, all told around 140,000 people. The cenotaph says:

“Please rest in peace, for we shall not repeat the error”.

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Cenotaph.

Looking through the cenotaph you can see the A-Bomb Dome, which is the ruins of a building near the centre of the nuclear explosion that partially survived. It is left as it is in memory of the victims.

The Peace Memorial Park is a place for reflection on the horrors of a nuclear war, and there is a harrowing museum there showing the effects that the atomic bomb had on the city and its people.

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The A-Bomb Dome with modern Hiroshima behind.

Today Hiroshima is a modern city reborn from the ashes, and a very vibrant metropolis. It’s in fact one of the best cities in Japan to visit.

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It’s hard to imagine the terror that happened in Hiroshima when looking at it today.

Hiroshima was targeted due to it being the base of the Japanese military high command. It’s controversial whether or not the atomic bomb should have been used to hasten the end of WW2.

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A-Bomb Dome at night.

Its a strange sight seeing the ruins of the A-Bomb Dome amongst modern Hiroshima. The dome was the Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall.

The Japanese people feel very strongly in their role in promoting world peace after the use of the atomic bomb on their country, and the devastation of WW2.

Today people and leaders from all over the world come to pledge for peace, remember the terrible hell of nuclear weapons, and to remind each other that there is a better way than war for all humankind.

Peace.

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